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annamaria1By Brian Hayes

Find out how Anna Maria was able to average over 16 yards per completion using a play that most teams consider to be a "quick" concept.

By Brian Hayes

Offensive Coordinator

Anna Maria College (MA)

 

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coachhayesEditor’s Note:  Coach Hayes have been a quarterbacks coach and a coordinator at the collegiate level for the past 8 years. Prior to being named as the offensive coordinator at Anna Maria, Coach Hayes was the quarterbacks coach at Copiah-Lincoln Community College and Assumption College.  Brian has worked with a lot of great coaches from all levels and credits them with helping him develop as a young coach in this great profession.

 

 

Introduction:

The Sail concept for us has been a very successful one to us over the 3 years that I have been a coordinator here and Anna Maria. We are able to use our running backs in this as the third receiver in the route progression. We averaged 16.2 yards per completion with this concept.

Our Sail concept is primarily a 3 X 1 concept but we also have variations where we run it out of 2 X 2. We will run Sail against any coverage and we like it in a 2nd and 3rd and medium to long yardage situations.  The great thing about this concept is we use it with a few different protections. The majority of the time we sprinted to it but we will also use our drop back protection and playaction series.

Slide1

We also have a few adjustments to this concept using our motions and using free releasing our back out of the backfield.  We will line up in a 2X2 set and use our scat protection which alerts our running back to free release and now he becomes the 3rd receiver in the concept. 

Slide2

Receiver Rules:

#1 WR to the call side will run a vertical versus a MOF closed look. If we are a getting an MOF open look we tell him to run a take 2 vertical. We have to make sure we do a great job getting a good outside release to stay on our landmark. If he gets a MOF closed look with press man coverage look then we will outside release that also.

#2 WR to the call side will run a 12-14 yard speed cut out. He has to really do a good job of pushing vertical and really stretching the defender trying to wall him off or the defender who is responsible for carrying him on the vertical.  On our break our receivers have to make sure that they are flatting out and not drifting on the route.

#3 WR will run a 3-5 yard flat route. Again with this out route we have to make sure that we don’t drift on our route. If we are in a 2 X 2 formation we will then free release the back and he becomes the #3 to the call side.

#1 WR backside will run a post route. If we are sprinting away from him then he will work across the field on a drag route at 14-16 yards.

#2 Backside in a 2 X 2 set he will have what we call blitz control backside. He will run a 3-5 yard speed cut out.

 

What you’re missing…

X&O Labs Insiders members will gain full access to the entire clinic report on Coach Hayes' Sail Concept including:

  • A detailed breakdown of how Coach Hayes teaches his quarterbacks to quickly and successful read the Sail Concept starting BEFORE THE SNAP.

  • The top two coaching points that Coach Hayes emphasizes when coaching this play.

  • How they marry their protections with the Sail Concept to give the QB time to accurately read the play.

  • Plus game film of the Sail Concept and much more…

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Conclusion

For our offense here at Anna Maria, this play has been great for us because of the variety of formations and options that it gives us within just this one concept. I want to thank X and O labs for the opportunity to share a piece of our offense with this great site and if anyone has any questions feel free to contact me.

Comments (3)
  • charlie  - blocking the DE to the sail side

    Coach,

    If you are sprinting out to the sail side how do you block the DE to that side?

    With releasing all three sail side receivers and having your other two receivers in routes on the backside it would look like the DE would be in the face of your QB even before he could set his feet to throw.

  • Bob  - Blocking the DE

    Coach Charlie,

    I can't speak for the author but for us, when sprinting to it, we take the RB out of the route and he seals the playside DE. We have also run it as a play action a multitude of ways. Say your in a 2x2 set and the arrow route (#3) is in an H-Back position, post snap he comes across between the QB and the DE and leaks to the flats while the QB and RB fake Zone. The QB is then on a naked boot to the sail side.

    In my experience, unless your Sail side OT is a man among boys and can reach with no problem, you need to account for the DE by either a play fake or by sealing him on sprint out.

    Hopefully that gives you some ideas.

  • Brian Hayes  - sprint out

    We tell the back to aim for the outside leg of the DE and we cut him or pin him inside. If the end gets up the field we tell the back to kick him out and the back steps inside of the block

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