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iwccBy Nick Coleman, Offensive Coordinator, Itawamba Community College

See how Coach Coleman create different looks and creates advantages by using various tags within common Airraid passing concepts.



By Nick Coleman - @QB_CoachColeman

Offensive Coordinator

Itawamba Community College

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Editor’s Note:  Nick Coleman is the new Offensive Coordinator/QB Coach at Itawamba Community College in Fulton, MS.  

 

Offensive football in today’s college football world has evolved over the past 20 years.  With more programs running an up-tempo spread style offense and the argument of the 10 second rule by defensive coaches, it is obvious this style of offense has caught the attention of the college football world.  One of the most popular spread offenses is the “Air Raid” offense and its light it up passing attack.  These concepts have been putting up record breaking numbers at every level of college football from FBS, FCS, Division II, Division III, and NAIA for over 20 years.  Although there are many different versions of the Air Raid in college football today, a lot of the same base concepts are prevalent throughout each program.  The most successful version I ran this past year was taking basic Air Raid passing concepts and adding backside tags.

The reasoning behind adding backside tags to these concepts is to give the QB an option based off coverage.  Instead of running mirrored concepts we put tags on the backside of basic Air Raid concepts.  Every tag and concept has basic rules that puts the QB in the correct spot to throw the football. 

The first backside concept is the “Snag” concept. 

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Most Air Raid offenses run backside slants opposite of the base concept.  We would tag the “Snag” concept to give the QB a better option against 2 high safeties.

Here is the “Scat” concept with the “Snag” routes tagged on the backside:

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Here are the QB rules:

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Click on the link below to view this concept in action:

This is a single WR snag tag off the Verticals.  This allows the coach to tag a WR on a snag route to counter a defense who is “walling” the inside vertical.

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“Snag” tag off the Vertical Concept

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QB Rules:

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Click on the link below to view this concept in action:

 

 

What You're Missing:

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  • Coach Colman’s “Decatur” tag which attacks two-high coverages including route adjustments, QB read progressions and game cutups of the concept.
  • Coach Coleman’s “C.O.P.” tag which attacks boundary combination coverage including route adjustments, QB read progressions and game cutups of the concept.
  • Coach Coleman’s “Odie” tag which attacks cover two man concepts including route adjustments, QB read progressions and game cutups of the concept.
  • Coach Coleman’s “Y Cross” tag which attacks man coverage including route adjustments, QB read progressions and game cutups of the concept.
  • Coach Coleman’s “arrow/under” tag which also attacks man coverage including route adjustments, QB read progressions and game cutups of the concept.

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These tags can be used in a variety of ways off of different concepts while using different formations and personnel.  The Air Raid pass game is one of the most successful offenses in college football.  By adding these backside tags to Air Raid concepts a coach gives the offense a chance to be successful depending on the coverage is presented. 

 

 

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