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By Mike Kuchar, Senior Research Manager, X&O Labs


It’s clear why more offensive coordinators are implementing pre-snap shifts and motions this season. Pre-snap movement not only puts a defensive unit on its heels, but also distorts its eye discipline, producing the anxiety needed to slow them down by the time the ball is snapped. But, offensively, the challenge lies in keeping verbiage concise to not confuse players and correlating with what player is moving. We were curious to see how coaches were packaging their movements and concepts into one-word calls.

 



By Mike Kuchar
Senior Research Manager
X&O Labs
Twitter: @MikekKuchar

 

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Introduction

It’s clear why more offensive coordinators are implementing pre-snap shifts and motions this season. Pre-snap movement not only puts a defensive unit on its heels, but also distorts its eye discipline, producing the anxiety needed to slow them down by the time the ball is snapped. But, offensively, the challenge lies in keeping verbiage concise to not confuse players and correlating with what player is moving. We were curious to see how coaches were packaging their movements and concepts into one-word calls. So, to explore how coaches were designing their pre-snap movement verbiage for this coming fall, we reached out to seven offensive coaches- many of them no-huddle advocates- to ask them the following questions:

  1. What is the signal or verbiage you use for perimeter (receivers and tight ends) motions in your system? Give an example of how is it tied into a play call.
  2. What is the signal or verbiage your use for perimeter (receiver and tight ends) shifts in your system? Give an example of how is it tied into a play call.
  3. What is the signal or verbiage your use for backfield motions in your system? Give an example of how is it tied into a play call.

Although their responses are posted anonymously, the contributor list is below:

 

Contributors (In Alphabetical Order):

  • Andrew Coverdale, offensive coordinator, Trinity High School (KY)
  • Eric Davis, head football coach, Mankato East High School (MN)
  • Dan Ellis, head football coach, Great Valley High School (PA)
  • Gabe Fertitta, offensive coordinator, Catholic High School (LA)
  • Matt Kerstetter, offensive coordinator, Westfield High School (TX)
  • Jeff Russell, offensive coordinator, Wethersfield High School (CT)
  • Steve Steele, head football coach, T.F. Riggs High School (SD)


Continue to the full-length version of this report…

Join X&O Labs’ Insiders, an exclusive membership-based website, and you’ll get instant access to the full-length version of this report—including access to everything X&O Labs has ever published. Plus, if you join today, you’ll also receive up to 4 FREE books mailed directly to your home or office. Here’s just a small sample of what you’ll find in the full-length version of this report:

  • How tempo coaches are designing hand signals to correlate to the specific pre-snap movement.
  • How coaches are designing word association verbiage to simplify pre-snap movement.
  • How coaches are tying quarterback gesticulation into designing pre-snap movement.
  • How coaches are using directional calls to design pre-snap movement packages.

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Conclusion

The challenge is packaging the pre-snap movement with the play call. Our goal with this research report is to provide coaches with the simple, yet effective verbiage needed to get their players in a matchup advantage pre-snap to make plays.

 

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